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Religious and Pilgrims items

Stunning medieval gold statue pendant - C13th judging by the Lombardic script on the scroll . This is probably to do with the Catholic church (DEI) and one of the members suggested FRCO is St Francis

 

Medieval gold figurine

PAS no: ESS-49E265

 

Treasure Report:   2008 T581                                                                            
Parish/County:          Tendring District, Essex

A medieval figure of John the Baptist. The saint is shown not in his usual attribute of a camel skin, but in the robes of a prophet. He gestures with his right hand to a salver, which he holds in his left. This was originally designed to carry a lamb, signifying the Lamb of God. A scroll issues from the Saint’s left hand and is inscribed with the words
: ECCE +ANGUS+DEI
(Behold, the Lamb of God)

The figure stands on a small plinth with a finished base. It is designed to be seen in the round and on its back there is a loop for attachment to an object. It would probably have been entirely enamelled, but no traces of enamel survive on the figure.

The figure is gold and dates from the late fifteenth or early sixteenth century.

Dimensions: height 33 mm, width 11 mm, depth 10 mm.

 

Consequently, in terms of age and as the object contains a minimum of 10% precious metal it qualifies as Treasure under the stipulations of the Treasure Act 1996.

         
J P Robinson
Curator of Medieval Collections
30th March 2009

15th/16thC religious pendant

IHS: dating from the 8th c., this is an abbreviation for "IHESUS," the way Christ's Name was spelled in the Middle Ages (despite popular belief, the monogram stands neither for "Iesus Hominum Salvator" --"Jesus Saviour of Men" -- nor for "In His Service.") Popularized by St. Bernardine of Siena, the monogram was later used by St. Ignatius of Loyola as a symbol for the Jesuit Order.

The IHS monogram is an abbreviation or shortening of Jesus' name in Greek to the first three letters. Thus ΙΗΣΟΥΣ, ιησυς (iēsus, "Jesus"), is shortened to ΙΗΣ (iota-eta-sigma), sometimes transliterated into Latin or English characters as IHS or ΙΗC.

The symbol is said to appear rarely in the catacombs, only in the catacomb of Priscilla and the atrium of the Capella Gr�ca (Greek Chapel).1 It was popularized in the fifteenth century, however, by Franciscan disciple Bernadine of Sienna as a symbol of peace. In 1541 St. Ignatius Loyola adopted the symbol with three nails below and surrounded by the sun as the seal of the Jesuit order.

Contrary to some authors, the monogram originally stood for neither for Iesus Hominum Salvator ("Jesus Savior of Men") nor for "In His Service." Some attribute its origin to Constantine's vision, where he saw a cross with the inscription "In hoc signo vinces" ("in this sign you shall conquer,"2 which is abbreviated, according to them, as IHS. However, this seems to require a stretch, as do claims that it is really a pagan symbol. The simplest explanation, as an abbreviation of Jesus' name, is best.

 

 

I wonder if you are able to assist.
I am President of the Monumental Brass Society (a registered charity (no.214336) and have been advised of the find by Tenn Brad reported on your excellent website (see attached pdf).
This object is in fact part of a scroll from a monumental brass dated c.1450. The inscription is in Latin and reads "Pray for the soul of". It is not from a paten and not of such an early date. However, it is a fascinating discovery. All the more so because it was obviously recovered from    my local area. I live in Colchester! Would it be possible to be put in contact with the finder to learn more about this find and perhaps produce a rubbing from the object?
Keep up the good work.
Martin Stuchfield

Medieval papal badge
Medieval papal badge
Medieval papal badge (earlier face)
Medieval 'Norfolk type' lead Pilgrim's Ampullae - Fleur de lis and crown
Medieval lead pilgrims Ampullae

Pilgrim ampullae - holly water bottle made of lead 12th to 15thC,

These ampoule were brought from pilgrimage places as a souvenir

Mitchiner suggests that many ampullae were used in the annual springtime ’Blessing the Fields’ ceremony, in which the Holy Water they contained was sprinkled on the ground to give prayer for a good harvest. Having served this purpose, Mitchiner suggests that the ampullae were discarded. Others have suggested that the ampullae were buried along with their contents for a similar purpose.

 

 

 

 

Medieval lead pilgrims ampullae with flower pattern. East Anglia type many made at Walsingham

12th -15thC Pilgrims lead ampullae - East Anglia type

A flask-shaped pilgrim’s ampulla. One face has a scallop-shell design, a sign of pilgrimage

Medieval lead pilgrims ampulla - East Anglian type with petal design

East Anglian type with shell design

Pilgrim ampullae - holly water bottle made of lead 12th to 15thC,

These ampoule were brought from pilgrimage places as a souvenir

Mitchiner suggests that many ampullae were used in the annual springtime ’Blessing the Fields’ ceremony, in which the Holy Water they contained was sprinkled on the ground to give prayer for a good harvest. Having served this purpose, Mitchiner suggests that the ampullae were discarded. Others have suggested that the ampullae were buried along with their contents for a similar purpose.

East Anglian Type - IC stands for Jesus Christ - 54.25g, 49.34mm H x 31.73mm W x 13.94mm T

Pilgrim ampullae - holly water bottle made of lead 12th to 15thC,

These ampoule were brought from pilgrimage places as a souvenir

 

Medieval lead pilgrims ampulla - Salisbury type
Medieval lead pilgrims ampulla - East Anglian type with petal design

Pilgrim ampullae - holly water bottle made of lead 12th to 15thC, Scallop shell type with merchant shield on reverse

Medieval pilgrims ampulla

 

1159 - 1181 AD Pope Alexander lead Papel badge -33.03 mm L

13thC lead papal badge

Medieval badges Ref Mitchiner p244 939 - 941

 

'A badge for a Knight of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre in bronze and dating somewhere around C13/14th possibly very slightly later . This is a very scarce item and it relates to The Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulchre of Jerusalem being a Catholic chivalric order of Knighthood that traces its roots to Godfrey of Bouillon, principal leader of the First Crusade. According to reliable sources in the Vatican and Jerusalem, it began in historical reality as a mixed clerical and lay confraternity (association) of pilgrims which gradually grew around the most central of the Christian holy places in the Middle East, the Holy Sepulchre or the tomb of Jesus Christ.This would have been a pin for a member of the order , there is a mark on the reverse where the original pin would have been fixed '

 

Medieval lead cross
Tiny Medieval Madonna and child figure 2.86g, 26.01mm
Post medieval

Circa 1485 - 1540

Sheet copper-alloy mount or badge of cross-crosslet shape; turned-over edges The reverse shows evidence of a central soldered attachment, which is now missing.

Circa 1485 - 1540

Sheet copper-alloy mount or badge of cross-crosslet shape; turned-over edges The reverse shows evidence of a central soldered attachment, which is now missing.

Not sure yet
20th C cross
Medieval cross mout
Not sure yet
20th C cross with glass stone
20thC St Christopher medallion
S.Vincenzo Di Paolo

La Sza Vergine Dolorosa

'Way of the Cross '

19thC Pope medallion PAVLVS.A
20thC Religious medallion

Cross with inscription - DE LA MISSION

 

Rare C1480 AD Boy Bishop token for this area, at 26.22mm dia it is a large token based on the long cross groat coin of the period This practice of issuing Boy Bishop tokens was confined mainly to Ely, Sudbury and Ipswich with the main centre Bury St Edmunds. These could be used as alms to buy food and drink at local shops. The shopkeeper would have received reimbursement from the abbey
Pilgrims badge
Pilgrims badge
Religious Pendant probably 19thC
Georgian religious medallion
Medieval lead pilgrims badge
Interesting cross find- not sure if this is as old as it looks but taking it to the museum for their views.
Victorian religious medallion
14thC John the Baptist medallion

Victorian pendant

 

'God is our refuge and strength'

'Who shall separate us from the love of Christ'

 

19thC religious cross
Excellent medieval religious mount - gold and red enamel remain
20thC St Christopher silver pendant
Medieval gilded cross fragment

Medieval silver cross - similar construction to 13thC Knights templer badges 1.06g, 22.82mm