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Harness Mounts, pendants and decorations

Shield Pendants -- Our Magna Carta Collection

Hi everyone,

I have been doing a bit more research on the shield pendant that I found. I can't believe I didn't discover this earlier.
Here is a picture of my Shield Pendant. We determined it was a red background with a gold lion.



Originally, while in England, I discovered that it belonged to one of the Counts of Arundel, Richard FitzAlan. Well, apparently it belonged to all the Counts of Arundel.

From My Research, it first belonged to William d'Aubigny or D'Aubeney or d'Albini. It looks like there were 3 Williams (all Fathers and Sons, who used this shield. (on Some Rolls, he is called Hugh D'Aubigny, but it is definately a William). The Third William here, was one of the barons that made King John Sign the Magna Carta, 1215.

So here is the fun part. Look here, if you will: All four of those shields we have found on top of this page belong to guys who made King John Sign the Magna Carta.

http://www.colchestertreasurehunting...nessmounts.htm

You can see that by looking here at the shields:
http://pages.prodigy.net/reed_wurts/...ta/magchrt.htm


So as the Shield and the Title of Count of Arundel was passed down, it came to be that the Last William d' Aubigny had no male heirs, so the Shield passed Maternally to Richard Fitzalan about 1275 or so. (Richard was only 5 years old). And this Richard passed it down to his Fitzalan Heirs.
My Favorite Roll of Arms is the Caerlaverock Poem, as not only does it describe the arms of the Knights, but it also says a brief word about them. The Caerlaverock Poem was from 1300 when King Edward attacked the Caerlaverock Castle.

King Edward the first, invading Scotland in 1300.

Richard, the Earl of Arundel, A handsome and well-beloved knight,
I saw there, richly armed,
In Red with a Gold Lion Rampant.

With him, Robert Fitz-Walter, Who well knew the business of arms, And Practiced it whenever required, on a yellow banner he had, a fess between 2 red chevrons.I included the stuff here about Fitz-Walter because it just goes to show that these families were fighting together through generations.
And Mark found His Fitz-Walter Shield VERY Close to where I found my d'Aubigny/Fitz-Alan Shield. (perhaps the Barons were gathering near Colchester for a meeting about King John).

Anyway, I think this is super neat stuff. I hope we can find some more of these Magna Carta Barons.

Cal Jim

What an amazing find - Early Medieval harness pendant with rampant lions and cross banding design in blue and white enamel work

This appears to be the arms of the Earl of Hereford 14thC - 30.13 mm L x 22.31 mm W

Humphrey De Bohun
(1312-1360)
Earl of Hereford
Earl of Essex
Earl of Northampton
Born 25th March 1342
Died 16th January 1373, probably at Pleshey, Essex

 

http://www.britannia.com/bios/lords/hereford7hb.html

13thC heraldic shield mount - Gules three cinquefoils a chief or

Cal Jim our club's heraldic expert has researched it and found the owner, Guillaume de Moncarvel

Medieval heraldic shield pendant - yellow and red enamelling remaining - Cal Jim just ID'd the family

Jean de Chalon "le sage" (1190-1267)
Count of Burgundy and Chalon (sur Saône). Count of Auxonne from 1230.
John was the son of Stephen III, Count of Auxonne. He took the name and the coat of arms of Chalon. In 1237, he swapped Auxonne and Chalon with the duke of Burgundy, for the lordship of Salins (and its valuable saltworks).
John married Mahaut, sister of Duke Eudes III of Burgundy, then Isabeau daughter of Robert I of Courtenay and finally Laure of Commercy.
He fought at Toulouse 1211 and Avignon 1226

 

Medieval enameled gold and red harness shield pendant. 45.53mm L 28.70mm w

'Found more on De Clare-- seems there was a Gilbert "The Red" (red haired) de Clare & son of Richard-- was one of the Earls of Gloucstershire (7th , I think) and had a whole bunch of other lands in 20 counties in Eng and Ireland. Joined the Montfort rebellion against the king. Married a jaon (Johanna) daughter of Edward II Longshanks , she was born in Acre - the site in the holy land where the Crusaders / Templar's lost it all . He was born in 1243'.

Robert FitzWalter - 2 enameled 13thC heraldic shield pendants

Or a fess between two chevrons gules

6Robert le FizWater

Stunning large enamelled medieval heraldic shield mount - 40mm high


Stunning medieval harness pendant - blue and red enamel with gold

Small mount

 

In 1206 King John refused to agree to Pope Innocent III's choice of Archbishop of Canterbury after his own choice had been rejected. Because the king still challenged the pope, in 1207 he was excommunicated (not allowed to be a member of the church) and an 'interdict' was issued by the pope.

Because of the interdict, the churches closed and their bells fell silent. With the church doors locked, services could not take place. The dead had to be buried in fields instead of in holy ground. People could not marry in church and baptisms had to be carried out in church porches.

King John's excommunication also let off the barons from their oath of loyalty to him. Because they might rebel against him at any time, King John acted quickly against anyone who looked as though they might be disloyal. We know from the Medieval Chronicles that Robert FitzWalter, the 3rd Lord of Dunmow Castle, was accused of plotting to kill King John during a rebellion in 1212. The rebellion was quickly quashed. FitzWalter was outlawed and fled to France.

Eventually in 1213, the Pope told King Philip of France that he could invade England and King John finally agreed to the Pope's terms including his choice of Archbishop. Robert FitzWalter returned home and, with the other Barons, he made peace with King John.

This did not last long, however. It was found that FitzWalter was still plotting against the King and urging for the government to be reformed. Because of this, his home in London, the Castle of Baynard, was almost entirely destroyed

Taxes, during King John's reign, were very high and became ever higher.

In 1214, King John left England to fight a war in France. To make sure the army had enough supplies, the king's Regent of the time, Peter de Roches, raised a very big tax on the barons. The war was lost and, as in the story, on the Kings' return, Robert FitzWalter called a meeting at Bury St Edmunds Abbey where it was agreed that the King must agree to the laws and freedoms granted to the barons in the charter of Henry 1st, or they would declare war on him.

Robert FitzWalter led the Baron's army under the title "Marshal of the Army of God and the Holy Church." In the end, the King was forced to sign the Magna Carta at Runnymede on 15th June 1215. Several copies of the Magna Carta documents still exist.

Magna Carta means 'great charter'. To abide by Magna Carta, the King had to agree to certain laws and accept that his will was not above the law. It was not the first written document that put limits on the power of a king, but it was the first that was backed up by a council (of 25 barons) to try and make sure the king obeyed. It included a paragraph that said 'no free man shall be seized, imprisoned, disposed, outlawed, exiled or ruined in any way ? 'except by the lawful judgment of his peers?'

John did not sign the document willingly and never intended to keep to it. In September 1215, just a few months after signing the charter, King John sent a message to the Pope asking him to annul the charter. The Pope agreed and excommunicated the barons that had signed it.

As the fighting started again, FitzWalter slipped off to France and offered Prince Louis the English throne. Both Scottish and French armies invaded England. After fighting off the Scottish forces, King John's army changed direction to East Anglia, intending to quash the baron's rebellion. As his troops crossed the river Ouse on 11th October, they were caught by the rising tide and the crown Jewels sank into the Wash. Just a few days later, on 19th October, King John died at Newark.

At the time of his death, the French flag flew over East Anglia. However, a French King did not rule England as no bishop would crown Prince Louis and many of the barons, who had rebelled against King John, now gave their support to his nine-year-old son Henry.


When John became King on the death of his brother Richard in 1199, the treasury (money for running the kingdom) was nearly empty. His answer was to raise money through taxes and his reign was one of harsh laws and heavy taxes.

At the start of his reign, while he was away from England, he left Geoffrey FitzPeter in control as 'Regent'. He was a harsh man and did not worry about demanding heavy taxes and gave the local sheriffs a free hand to collect these by any means. He became very unpopular.

Like most Kings of the time John was ruthless. It was also claimed that King John killed his nephew, Arthur, in 1206, to make sure of the future of the throne. However, history may not have been very fair to King John. At this time the historians, or chroniclers, were mainly monks. These monks would have been in sympathy with the parties that King John was arguing with - that is the church and the rich estate owners (barons).

King John's reign was far from all bad for the country. Many towns such as Cambridge, Ipswich, King's Lynn and Norwich grew rich as they were given 'charters' and encouraged to govern themselves. The towns benefited from changes in the way taxes were paid and could get income from taxing market traders entering the town.

R. Turner 1994 argued that John "...had intelligence, administrative ability and he was good at planning military campaigns. However, too many personality flaws held him back". Unfortunately for King John, no king of the time could have run the country successfully without the support of the powerful Barons and Noblemen.

What of Matilda's supposed murder and her links with Robin Hood?


Robin and Marion
The monk, Matthew Paris, writing in his diary some years later in the 13th century, mentions the murder of Matilda. He records that in 1234/5, Robert FitzWalter died and that "?y his first wife, FitzWalter had, with other children, a daughter, Matilda the Fair, called 'Maid Marion,' said to have been poisoned by King John."

Matilda, his daughter, may indeed have been beautiful but very little is known of her life and death. After the rebellion of 1212, when FitzWalter and his family fled to France, it seems that he made his actions seem good, by saying the king was after his daughter and was plotting to kill his son-in-law.

King John was not a pleasant man, but many historians do not believe FitzWalter's story. Robert FitzWalter had a shady past. He had surrendered Vaudreuil in France to the French king in 1203 under suspicious circumstances. So, whether what he did was because of King John's interest in his daughter or came from a wish for more power is difficult to say.

The character of Maid Marion, like Friar Tuck, is not in the early ballads of Robin Hood. The character of Maid Marion probably came from an early French Pastoral romance ??he shepherd and shepherdess Robin and Marion'. Parts of this story and the Robin Hood stories probably merged and Maid Marion became Robin Hood's true love in the later versions of the legend.

It is in Anthony Munday's Elizabethan "Huntingdon" plays; written in the 17th century that Marian becomes an alias employed by Matilda FitzWalter. A popular romance at the time was the legend of King John pursuing Matilda, daughter of Robert FitzWalter. Robin Hood or Robin of Loxley, if such a person existed, was not a well-known Nobleman but most likely a wronged landowner, fighting to regain his family seat.

Dunmow Priory in Essex is said to be the resting-place of Robin Hood's Maid Marian. All that remains of Dunmow Priory is the present church of Dunmow; the south aisle of what was once a much larger building. However the story lives on, along with the many other tales of Robin Hood; and King John's jewels and royal regalia remain a treasure trove still to be found.

 

Medieval heraldic enameled shield mount - Claret coloured fesse - 3 rosettes on red enameled background

 

He is Moncarvel Gules three cinquefoils or

Number 3198 European Rolls of the Thirteenth Century 3151-3200

Jim

14thC Heraldic medieval shield pendant - rampant Lion with enameled inlay - researching the family

Ok, as of yet, I only find one shield with the red rampant lion, and the background with split colors. Now, since we see a bit of gold on the back and on the top, I think it is safe to assume that the left side of this shield was gold.

But the right side, we are going to have to make a bit of stretch. What appears to be white on the right side, I am going to assume is a Green, faded by centuries in the ground.

So, if this is the case, I would describe this shield as: " Per Pale or and vert overall a lion rampant gules".

So I believe this shield belongs to one of the greatest of all knights, William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke and several of his descendants on his daughters side, Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk (2 with the same name).

http://www.castlewales.com/marshall.html

Cal Jim

Stunning 13thC Heraldic shield pendant - Blue enamelled bird with red feathers

Stunning medieval enamelled harness pendant

Stunning 14thC enamelled harness pendants

C13thC Medieval heraldic harness pendant - researching owner

Medieval harness hanger

Stunning 1500-1700 enameled mount

 

Medieval harness pendant

Huge medieval hanging lead pendant

Medieval heraldic shield mount - red and green enamel remains
Medieval harness enameled heraldic pendant- Lion passant motif - gilding and red enamel remains
Medieval heraldic shield mount
Medieval heraldic shield mount - red and green enamel remains
Medieval harness enameled heraldic pendant-
Medieval gilded harness pendant
Medieval heraldic shield mount - red and green enamel remains
13thC heraldic shield pendant - prancing lion facing left - red enamel and traces of gold
13thC Heraldic harness pendant - shield with 3 prancing lions facing left - red enamel and gilding

Stunning medieval heraldic pendant - two silvered eagle heads facing outwards on red enamel - griffin in blue square enamelled back ground

Researching the titled family

13thC Heraldic shield pendant Medieval harness pendant - some gilding remains
Georgian heavy horse harness name plate
19thC Harness decoration
19thC Harness decoration
Heraldic pendant with traces of red, blue and green enamelling remaining, First Earl of Lancaster, Edmond " Crunchback" , son of King Henry III. Around the end of `1200's
19thC harness mount
17thC harness mount
19thC Harness decoration
Post medieval harness pendant
18thC Harness decoration
19thC Harness decoration
19thC Harness decoration

19thC Harness decoration

Protection IR ?

14thC Enameled harness pendant
Post Medieval Enameled harness pendant with Eagle design
14thC Enameled harness pendant
Post Medieval harness pendant
18thC mount
14thC Harness hanger with inlay
17thC
Georgian heavy horse harness name plate
Medieval harness mount
13thC harness mount
Medieval enameled heraldic shield pendant
Medieval heraldic pendant
Medieval heraldic pendant
Medieval hanging pendant
Medieval shield harness decoration with circle design
Medieval enameled heraldic shield pendant
Medieval hanging pendant
Medieval hanging pendant
13thC medieval heraldic shield pendant
Medieval heraldic enameled mount
Superb Medieval heraldic shield pendant - black and white enamel - need research to find the family crest
Medieval gilded harness pendant
C13thC Medieval heraldic shield mount - traces of red and white enamel remains
Medieval mount
Medieval heraldic quadrefoil hanging pendant - This was originally thick with a hard crust and I have had this soaking in distilled water for several days. You can see a central box with 4 fleur de Lis appearing. I am hoping the green enamelling is intact under the crust so I am being mega careful
Medieval golded harness pendant
c13thC Cross pendant - thick gold plating remains
Early medieval gilded harness pendant - circle decoration
Excellent medieval religious mount - gold and red enamell remain
Early medieval gilded harness pendant
Medieval enamelled pendant
13thC medieval enamelled harness pendant - winged bird at centre
13thC medieval gilded harness pendant

Stunning 13thC medieval heraldic harness shield pendant

A medieval copper alloy horse harness pendant, shield-shaped, red enamel survives. Gules three owls ?Or/Argent. Possibly for Sir Richard BERMINGHAM, Gules three huits (owles in margin, L) Argent (Papworth 1874, rep. 1985, p. 329).

Inscription: Gules three owls ?Or/Argent.

Early medieval gilded and circle decorated harness pendant

13thC medieval heraldic shield pendant

Lion facing left

Medieval gilded harness pendant
Medieval gilded harness pendant

Large medieval decorated and gilded shield boss or mount - 4 rivet fixings

Obv - Cross with 4 Fleur de Lis in qtrs

Medieval heraldic shield pendant - looks like 3 right prancing lions in shield
Medieval harness pendant Medieval gilded harness pendant

Simply stunning chunky early medieval gold decorated bronze cross pendant - The gold pin decoration is very interesting as it probably riveted a central inlaid emblem which is now missing- one for the museum to play with

18.76g, 41.18 mm L x 6.73 mm T

 

Very interesting Roman bronze mount - could be a face

Medieval religious cross harness pendant Post medieval heraldic harness mount

Medieval enamelled heraldic pendant - De Clare

'Found more on De Clare-- seems there was a Gilbert "The Red" (red haired) de Clare & son of Richard-- was one of the Earls of Gloucstershire (7th , I think) and had a whole bunch of other lands in 20 counties in Eng and Ireland. Joined the Montfort rebellion against the king. Married a jaon (Johanna) daughter of Edward II Longshanks , she was born in Acre - the site in the holy land where the Crusaders / Templar's lost it all . He was born in 1243'.

Early medieval harness pendant
Stunning 13thC enamelled heraldic pendant - researching family

14thC Heraldic medieval shield pendant - rampant Lion with enameled inlay

" Per Pale or and vert overall a lion rampant gules".


So I believe this shield belongs to one of the greatest of all knights, William Marshall, Earl of Pembroke and several of his descendants on his daughters side, Roger Bigod, Earl of Norfolk (2 with the same name).

http://www.castlewales.com/marshall.html

Cal Jim

Georgian silver mount Early medieval bronze pendant
Early medieval gilded horse harness pendant Medieval harness pendant